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    Top 12 Best Places To Hide Valuables From Burglars

     

    You must be cautious and safe, especially if you live in a high-burglary neighborhood. It's preferable to be safe than sorry. You don't want to come home one day and discover that your home is in shambles and that all of your valuables have been stolen. 

     burglar with mask gloves hands up

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    A drawer or cupboard are some obvious places where we hide our valuables. This isn't a good idea. In this article, we'll learn about the finest places to hide your belongings so that if a robber breaks into your home, your possessions will be safe.

     

    Best Places To Hide Valuables

     

    1) Inside a Bottle of Water

     travah diversion bottle with compartment to stash small items

    Credit: Travah

     

    A seemingly innocent container can store far more than just water. Consider putting this onefrom Travahin your fridge: With a sealed cap, you can fill it with real water. However, if you pull it apart, you'll find a hidden dry compartment at the bottom, ideal for storing jewelry, spare cash, and other small objects. 

    Hide your valuables away from plain sight from those pesky thieves. There are plenty of other false containers like paint cans, a mayonnaise jar, a spare tire, fake food cans, or an inconspicuous jewelry box that you can use.

     

    false containers to store things hide from burglars

     

    2) Vacuum Cleaner

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    This is a fantastic alternative. Anything with a huge open cavity is ideal for storing valuables. Modern garage door openers have a wide area in the back where the light bulb is; old and unused equipment such as TVs and computer towers frequently have room, and the best of the lot might be an old vacuum cleaner. It is a fantastic hiding spot for hiding money and other items.

    A canister-style vacuum cleaner isn't ideal because they're commonly constructed of clear plastic, allowing the contents to be seen, but the variety that uses a bag is ideal. Remove the bag, stuff your things inside, then replace the lid. No burglar will touch it if you keep it in a closet. A garage-stored non-working shop vacuum is also a nice option.

     

    3) A Cat Litter Box 

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    Before you jump in and tell us that's awful, know that we're referring to a fake litter box. To put it another way, one that has never been used before and will never be used again. Of course, if you have a cat, this will not work for obvious reasons.

    Fill a tub with cat litter with small containers containing valuables, then pour the cat litter back into the tub.

     

    4) Pipes, vents, etc

     storing items in pipes

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    Home experts will advise you that concealing your valuables in dummy copies of household fixtures is a wonderful strategy to deter burglars. Consider PVC pipes, air vents, and outlets hidden behind the wall.

    Sure, it takes some elbow grease, but if you're even remotely imaginative, these projects can pay off handsomely for a fraction of the price of professional security solutions.

     

    5) Soccer Ball

     soccer ball in house hallway

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    What a brilliant idea for storing your valuables. A thief will not hesitate to inspect a soccer ball. Cut down the sides of the patches with a sharp knife and open it like a flap. Place the stash in place and fix it with tape. The flap should then be resewn and a small layer of transparent cement applied. An average thief is unlikely to search for a soccer ball.

     

    6) Medicine Bottles

     storing items in medicine prescription bottles

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    One of the first things robbers look for is a medicine cabinet. For their street value, they'll take any narcotic they can get their hands on. So don't try to conceal anything in there.

    Medicine bottles, on the other hand, can be used to conceal valuables that are then hidden outside the bathroom. Roll some money, place it in a prescription bottle or other watertight container, then bury it in a potted plant. Place a stone or pine cone over it for easier access and to keep dirt out of your fingernails. There aren't going to be many burglars digging around your houseplants.

     

    7) Faux Air Vent

     faux air vent

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    You shouldn't keep anything in your air vents because it could obstruct airflow. Consider building a faux air vent to conceal cash and other valuables instead. Thieves who need to get out of your home quickly are unlikely to unscrew them. You can store your valuables that are worth stealing in a large bag and then place them in the air vent.

     

    8) Yard Containers

     yard container outsite

    Credit: Deep Green Permaculture

     

    Burglars are more concerned with breaking into your home, therefore those enormous hard plastic barrel-shaped containers that people use in the yard would be a wonderful site!

    Put the stockpile in a thick plastic bag, add some silica desiccant packets to keep moisture out, duct tape it shut, and stuff it as far inside as you can. This is a great hiding spot to store your valuables inside and the best of all is that it has easy access. Keeping a yard container with a trusted neighbor or family member is also clever thinking.

     

    9) Toilet Paper Tube

     storing money in toilet paper holder bathroom

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    This approach is only useful for a small number of secret stashes — small notes, a mini USB drive (wrapped in a napkin to minimize the noise) — but it does use a location that criminals won't search. Although not every toilet paper holder tube is hollow, if you do have one, use it.

    Towel racks/bars can be used in the same way, although they're a little less accessible because you usually have to unscrew one of the ends to get to it. 

     

    10) Toilet Tile

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    You can hide a small storage box behind the tiles in your kitchen or bathroom if they are at least 3" by 3". Remove one tile off the wall and cut a hole slightly smaller than the tile. Then replace the tile with a little plastic bin attached to the back. When you require access, use a suction cup to grab the tile. Make sure you use a waterproof container so that moisture doesn't enter.

     

    11) Appliance Caper

     storing items under appliances

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    This is a great hiding place. A snap-off grille is found on the front of refrigerators and dishwashers. There's a lot of hidden storage space beneath there. Consider this: how many robbers will consider cleaning the coils on your refrigerator? 

    However, before stuffing valuables under a fridge, check to see where the coils are. A stack of cash on some versions may obstruct ventilation. This will make the refrigerator work harder, and it may cause damage.

     

    12) Family Album

     family photo album to store hide items

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    Those old photo albums are never looked at, but they are also never thrown away. That's why they're the best spot to stash some cash in case of an emergency

    Use one of those translucent pockets to keep your money or jewelry out of sight and away from prying eyes. In a family album, you may rest assured that your valuables will be kept safe. You can keep the family album in the master bedroom or anywhere it wouldn't look suspicious. You can also hide items behind a picture frame.

     

    Summary

    In a nutshell, the key is to keep your things hidden and to think like a thief. Consider the first location you'd look to if you were planning a robbery. If your answer is dresser drawers or a cupboard, these are the first places to avoid.  You must be able to outsmart your enemy. Don't forget to update your home security system regularly.

    We hope that this list has given you some suggestions for hiding your valuables. Burglary is a common occurrence. You have a 15% probability of getting robbed. Isn't it, therefore, preferable to be safe than sorry? A little clever thinking and you're good to go!